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Fadumo Dayib: From Refugee to Somalia’s first female Presidential Candidate

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By Taryana Odayar.  Fadumo Dayib was born in a displacement camp in Kenya to Somali parents who had travelled there after losing eleven previous children to preventable diseases. Her family sold all their possessions so that she could escape to Finland as a refugee, where she has lived since 1990. Although she did not learn to read and write until she was fourteen years old, she went on to study…

From Freedom Fighter to Presidential Candidate: Can Joice Mujuru topple Mugabe?

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By Taryana Odayar.  Joice Mujuru was the first Vice President of Zimbabwe, serving from 2004 – 2014, and is a Presidential candidate for the 2018 elections. She was a panellist for the ‘Women Leaders on the Global Stage: lessons for Africa’ public lecture hosted by LSE’s Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa and Africa Talks, held on Tuesday 7th March ahead of International Women’s Day. At the age of 17, Mujuru…

The Alt-Right Death Cult, Fascist Memes and Me

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By J.T. Stokes For the past year I have been fascinated with the progressive left’s most versatile enemy to date – the Alt-Right. This fascination stemmed from two main sources. Firstly, from an earnest academic interest in the nature and dynamics of digital communities. And secondly, from an aesthetic interest in internet anonymity and its potential to produce colourful alternative movements – both in art and politics. There was one…

Is Direct Rule Inevitable in Northern Ireland?

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By Oliver Wheeler For the first time since the creation of a devolved Northern Irish legislature in 1921, unionists have lost their majority in a snap election that took place on March 2nd. The Democratic Unionist Party, the strongest party in the Assembly since its powers were restored in 2007, now has only one more seat than its republican rival Sinn Féin, and on first preferences the parties were separated…

China’s Rise and Superpower Warfare

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By K Goh The meteoric rise of China as an economic power in the last three decades has led International Relations theorists such as John Mearsheimer to predict the coming of intense conflict between the People’s Republic of China and the United States. This case is driven by three main arguments: domestic politics, economic interdependence and the problem presented by a security dilemma. First, in marginalising the influence of domestic…

Fighting for Free Speech in Turkey

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By Paula Grabosch Journalism is not a crime. With these words emblazoned across their banners, protesters drove through Berlin and other German cities last week in solidarity with Deniz Yücel. The #FreeDeniz movement was brought to life after the German-Turkish journalist was taken into police custody in Istanbul last Monday.   On the 14th February, the 43-year-old correspondent for German newspaper Die Welt was arrested and has now, two weeks…

America First, Democracy Second?

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By Zikai Chua “Enemies of the people” was the phrase US President Donald Trump used to describe media outlets which publish what he labels “fake news”. The 45th President of the United States has faced intense scrutiny, often accompanied by harsh criticisms, of his each and every move during his short stint as President of the United States, and rightly so. In hindsight, perhaps the exclusion of news agencies (including…

Premium Friday: Tackling Overwork in Japan

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By Rajan Soni John Maynard Keynes, the renowned economist, once predicted in 1930 that the next generation would be working a mere 15 hours a week. Fast forward to 2017, however, and the topic of excessive working hours remains alive in our discourse, from in the media to economists and co-workers alike. Yet in Japan, the issue of overwork and its impact on health has been largely repressed by society,…

Navigating Choppy Waters: The Donald and Diplomacy

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By Jeremy Wong With Donald Trump now the President of the United States, the world watches his every move; trying to analyse and figure out the motivations as well as the implications of his new policies. Trump is not known to be likeable to most world leaders, and he has recently made relations with Beijing even sourer after his administration took a tougher stance on China regarding the South China…

The End of the Road for South Sudan?

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By Anonymous After the traumatic experience of the Sudanese Civil War, including massacres and the kidnap of children to be sold into slavery, the declaration of South Sudanese independence on the 6th July 2011 was a day of rejoicing. Crowds lined the streets to celebrate what they hoped would be the beginning of a bright future. Yet today, just 6 years later, there are already growing calls for an international…