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Category : Part B

Did I really need to buy a blender for freshers?

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My new Breville Blend Active Blender – complete with a 57 smoothie recipe book – has been sitting patiently in the corner of my bedroom for three days now, counting down the days before my start at LSE. I can already anticipate the number of times I will undoubtedly use its seven speed settings and superseal leak proof lid. When staggering back to my halls at god-knows-what-hour, I can already…

REVIEW: Herman Ze German, Soho

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Neraj Thangarajah – Food Editor German cuisine is often overlooked, with few claiming to have ever tried it and others often expressing little interest in it. It’s a real shame that the country is represented so poorly among these shores with regards to its culinary history, even if somewhat stereotypically. Focusing our attention on London in particular, which has lately been hit with street food fever it is surprising to…

HACKTIVISM101

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BY GILLIAN CAFIERO Cybersecurity firms have been raising fiery alarms about incumbent ‘Hacktivist’ threats for over a decade. After the Manning and Snowden cases, the press jumped on the bandwagon and connoted ‘hacktivism’ with espionage, war, terrorism and crime. However, the term has not always been used to denote sinister behavior and many still define it as a means to achieving positive social change. So just how big and bad…

Restaurant Review – Tibits

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    By Dennis Mooney – Executive Editor You can, it is said, take a horse to water, but you cannot make it drink. As a committed carnivore, I’ve always felt roughly the same way about vegetarian food. My only experience of specifically herbivorous consumption, did nothing to dispel this illusion; a falafel pitta from the Leeds Fest veggie van – the closest source of nourishment to my campsite –…

Steve McCurry’s Blog Documents a Decade of the Portrait Artist’s Finest Work

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BY Maryam Akram Steve McCurry the American photojournalist’s iconic photograph ‘the Afghan girl,’ taken in a refugee camp near Peshawar Pakistan, featured as the cover of National Geographic 1985. Twenty-nine years later and McCurry continues to poignantly capture the world in distinctively candid images. McCurry famously sewed rolls of film into his clothes when crossing the Afghan border disguised as a local. What makes McCurry’s photographs especially interesting is their…

BIANCO 43 – Restaurant Review

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BY Dorothy Wong Pizza as we currently know it is said to have originated from Naples, and the Margherita, reflecting the Italian flag’s red, white and green, said to be named in honour of Margaret of Savoy. The original dough can be traced back to Rome, Greece, and Egypt, and today travels around the world championed in different interpretations.   At the launch of Bianco 43 in Trafalgar Square, there…

Marginal (Dis)Utility: The Social Deaths of Unicorns

Marginal (Dis)Utility: The Social Deaths of Unicorns

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BY JADE JACKMAN When someone says ‘unicorn’, I immediately think of my little pony and candy canes. Or, even worse still, of swooshing tails, glitter and gender stereotypes. in his series, ‘Urban Legends’. In his series, ‘Urban Legends’. Jean-Yves Lemoigne presents a new side to the history of these fictitious creatures. Rather than drawing upon femininity, Lemoigne highlights another element of ‘the unicorn’ in his works. Instead, he focuses on…

Corriolanus – Review

Corriolanus – Review

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BY EMMA FORTH Booking tickets to see Coriolanus at the Donmar Warehouse was almost as stressful as last minute exam revision. Within 28 minutes of the box office opening the entire run had sold out in a frenzied fight over limited seats. Somewhere in amongst frantic refreshing I managed to secure what felt like a golden ticket, and had I not been on the ball I certainly wouldn’t have been…

HENRY V – Review

HENRY V – Review

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BY CHARLOTTE JUCKES Starring Hollywood A-Lister Jude Law as the king himself, Henry V is a spectacular finale toaward-winning British director Michael Grandage’s 15 month season at the Noel Coward theatre. Throughout the star-studded season 100,000 tickets have been made available for just £10, attracting a whole new audience of first-time theatregoers, and giving students the chance to see actors such as Judi Dench and Daniel Radcliffe at a price…

A Beckett Trilogy

A Beckett Trilogy

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BY JEFF MO Three plays, one woman, one hour – so went the triple bill of Samuel Beckett’s later plays Not I, Footfalls, Rockaby, performed by Irishwoman Lisa Dwan first at the Royal Court Theatre before transferring to the Duchess Theatre in the West End. Challenging works for the performer and the audience both, all three pieces are darkly tragic in nature, featuring troubled female protagonists whose lives seem to…