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Richard II – Review

Richard II – Review

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BY ANURADHA SANTHANAM FIVE STARS Curtains drawn. Dim blue lighting. An ethereal atmosphere enveloped us as we entered the hall, much before the play began. You could feel Shakespeare in the air. The Royal Shakespeare Company premiered Richard II in Stratford-upon-Avon, the home of the Bard himself, and where the RSC are based, in Autumn 2013. In a new collaboration with the Barbican, they will be performing different plays at…

Terms and Conditions – Review

Terms and Conditions – Review

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By JOSH JINRUANG Much like the definition of custard one of its protagonists attempts to nail down without much success, Terms and Conditions at White Bear Theatre is a slippery, messy, polymorphous piece of theatre that refuses to provide easy answers for all the difficult questions it raises throughout the story. Flirting with every topic from immigration policy to Jungian unconscious to the typical hypocrisy of the so-called liberal middle…

Henry V – Review

Henry V – Review

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By CHARLOTTE JUCKES 5/5 Stars Starring Hollywood A-Lister Jude Law as the king himself, Henry V is a spectacular finale toaward-winning British director Michael Grandage’s 15 month season at the Noel Coward theatre. Throughout the star-studded season 100,000 tickets have been made available for just £10, attracting a whole new audience of first-time theatregoers, and giving students the chance to see actors such as Judi Dench and Daniel Radcliffe at…

Let The Right One In – review

Let The Right One In – review

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By Hannah Webb 4/5 Stars Let The Right One In is the stage adaptation by Tom Thorne’s novel and John Ajvide Lindqvist’s film of the same name. The 2004 book was an international bestseller and the subsequent Swedish film was widely praised and won many awards. This production, directed by John Tiffany, originally enjoyed success in the Dundee Rep Theatre in the summer, before coming to Sloane Square for its…

Much Ado About Nothing – Review

Much Ado About Nothing – Review

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By Alexia Laird Much Ado About Nothing is generally considered one of Shakespeare’s best comedies, and rightfully so. This light-hearted and joyous play marks a welcomechange in the great British playwright’s portfolio and gives the grounds for an enjoyable two hours. For those who, like me, haven’t read Shakespeare’s works since school, I would suggest brushing up your knowledge by having a cheeky read of the Wikipedia page about the…

Much A-Stew About Nothing – review

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By Nathan Springer Stewart Lee’s latest stand-up show, Much A-Stew About Nothing, runs seven times a week at Leicester Square Theatre until 19 January. He enjoins would-be patrons on his website: “Do not go on Twitter saying it seemed disjointed. It should do and will.” The show is indeed a stew, one with different ingredients every night. But there is only one chef here, and it is the audience who…

The Dead Wait – review

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By Michelle Warbis – Theatre Editor An apartheid South Africa, the dreams of a racist nation rests on Josh Gilmore (Austin Hardiman), who is about to become the world’s first white man to crack a 10 second 100m sprint. But the dreams are crushed when Josh enters the Angolan war, where he faces a battle of humanity. Thus starts a story of a privileged young man learning what in life…

Austin Hardiman – interview

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MICHELLE WARBIS interviews actor AUSTIN HARDIMAN about his upcoming performance in The Dead Wait at The Park Theatre. Set in the Angolan Civil War in 1989, the play explores the idea of shared humanity amidst the backdrop of wartime brutality and racial division. First of all, I wondered whether you could tell me a little bit about the play. It’s about the Angolan war and the new South Africa—in particular…

Strange Factories – review

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By CAMILLA NASCHERT It is already dark as I approach the Cinema Museum in Elephant and Castle, slightly nervous about what I am about to experience. “Not everyone can survive the violence of creation,” read the flyer for John Harrigan’s cinema-theatrical fusion “Strange Factories”. Two girls are already waiting below a streetlight in safe distance from the entrance of the dusky brick building. I reach out to open the door…

FOG – review

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By MANDEER KATARIA Situated by Finsbury Park Station, The Park Theatre—labelled the new ‘off West End’ theatre—is combined with a café-bar to host a truly unique and vibrant set- ting for the hard-hitting per- formance of FOG. The minimalist setting, which only consists of a solitary, flickering lightbulb shone upon a bare concrete room, as well as a light use of props, appropriately pave the way for the intimate, gripping…