Queenie – a flawless illustration of black womanhood ★★★★

Queenie is a young journalist in London: trying to find cheap, non-mouldy accommodation, struggling to get an internship or success on dating apps. In the meantime, she enjoys cartons of ice cream while watching Pride and Prejudice. Queenie is a…

Things We Didn’t Talk About When I Was A Girl – Difficult to read – difficult to put down ★★★★★

In Things We Didn’t Talk About When I Was a Girl, Jeannie Vanasco achieves the extraordinary: She explores rape culture by using language to set herself free. Vanasco’s assailant is Mark, a friend she met at the age of thirteen.…

January 2020 – Starting the year with a bang!

The best of January films, tv shows, theatre productions, albums, and books to suit all tastes FILM  To start the decade off with a bang, we have a couple of highly-anticipated war films. The first is tipped to be a…

Worst book of the decade: List of the Lost by Morrissey, 2015

It’s not as if Morrissey needed additional opportunities to provoke unanimous public disgust in the 2010s. His outspoken support for the far-right Islamophobic political party For Britain, his concert performance with a “Fuck the Guardian” t- shirt, and his assertion…

Girl, Woman, Other – A Love Letter to Black Womanhood ★★★★

Bernardine Evaristo became the first black woman to co-win the Booker Prize, alongside Margaret Atwood. Her book, Girl, Woman, Other, follows the lives of 12 black women in the UK. Evaristo spins their disparate stories around Amma’s – a gay…

Rod Liddle – The Great Betrayal

The controversial journalist returns with a polemic that explains why Brexit hasn’t happened, and why it is unlikely to happen. But what – if anything – would Rod’s Brexit look like? It’s all maths, really. Not the ordinary democratic maths,…

Ali Smith’s Brexit novel is an instant classic

I do not remember who it was that read just a handful of stories as a child, but read them all 40 to 50 times. Being dwelled upon is an honour that a lot of authors deserve, but do not…

Review – The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy

Arundhati Roy’s second novel, unlike her massively successful debut The God of Small things, has not made it to the Man Booker Prize shortlist. This is unsurprising. The book is good, yes, and fans will find many of the elements…

Book review : Charlie Raymond’s “Hired, Fired, Fled”

By Taryana Odayar, Executive Editor. Fourteen jobs in fifteen years. That’s how long it took Charlie Raymond to come as close as he could to career contentment. From Africa to Europe, North America, and the Middle East, Raymond’s ‘BCO’ or ‘Blind Career Obsession’ takes him…