The Thing About Harry – hit me hard ★★★★

When Hulu first announced its new gay rom-com, I was sceptical: a young, attractive, white tw*nk who falls in love with his high school bully … where have I heard that one before? At first, I wasn’t even going to…

The Invisible Man – The ultimate cat and mouse ★★

I am a sucker for all things horror. The blood, gore, jump scares, and cinematic screams are all well and good, but the perfect horror has to have a great twist to prevent it from becoming a horror for the…

Love Letter (1953): Masculinity, survival, and the nation-state

Set in 1950 post-war Japan under the American Occupation – Reikichi, our quiet, melancholy protagonist, wanders around roads and railway stations in the hopes of finding his childhood sweetheart, Michiko, whose last letter he keeps in his wallet. Reikichi translates…

An impression of The Lighthouse

Robert Eggers’ most recent masterpiece, The Lighthouse, is a black and white depiction of an insular maritime setting where two men share their solitudes. The film narrates the relationship between two lighthouse keepers, who navigate through scenes of peace and conflict.

Dark Waters: a poignant attack on chemical giants and human greed ★★★★

Dark Waters uncovers the DuPont scandal, where lawyer Robert Billot (Mark Ruffalo) sued American chemical giant DuPont de Nemours for putting 70,000 people at risk of being poisoned by the man-made chemical PFOA (Teflon – think the stuff on your…

Joker: A clown act you’re unlikely to forget

The origin story of Batman’s arch-enemy defies the usual conventions of a comic book adaptation. Laughing out loud would be the last reaction you would have when watching Todd Phillips’ masterwork.

Why did Parasite capture our societal imagination?

Lots of people are praising Bong Joon Ho’s film Parasite, and for good reason. Most critics talk about his depiction of the polarisation of modern society, the suffering of socially marginalised groups, and how the comical twists balance out a dark, allegorical plot. This is all true.

March 2020 – films, TV shows, plays, albums, and books to look forward to

After a culturally poor February, you will be glad to hear that there is much more to look forward to in March! Films Continuing with the theme of horror films from February: personally I am extremely excited for the release…

Emma: It’s what Austen would have wanted ★★★★

2020 is the year ‘unlikeable’ women get their due and I am loving it – first Amy March, and now Emma Woodhouse. In contrast to Gerwig’s impassioned defence in Little Women, director Autumn de Wilde doubles down on this aspect…

Waiting for Anya: Not worth the wait ★★

Tackling the Holocaust warrants bravery and rendering such a tragedy into fiction for young audiences is a noble intention. Upon first glance, I assumed Waiting for Anya would possess the same brilliantly powerful flare as The Boy in the Striped…