“Colette”: A feminist portrait more forgettable than its subject

Colette had a daunting task: to defy gender norms and explore how an overshadowed artist can forge her own identity. The well-assembled biopic’s messages of empowerment are refreshingly authentic. But January sees the release of two other female-led period dramas.…

At LFF, An Audition For The Oscars

After premiering at the Venice, Toronto and New York film festivals, London welcomed many of the films that will be competing at the Oscars in February. Whilst you were skipping your 9am lectures, I was queuing outside a cinema. Here’s…

Explore The London Film Festival, At Your Own Risk

My relationship with The London Film Festival so far has been complicated by the fact that  some films have impressed me, but many have others have bored, angered or frustrated. Whilst such a diverse range of films are in town…

The Bizarre Bill Murray Sightings

“And no-one will ever believe you,” Bill Murray might quip after unexpectedly dropping into your life to create an everlasting memory. Tommy Avallone’s uplifting documentary recounts some of the bizarre stories surrounding the celebrated Hollywood actor. Although flawed in its…

“Joy”: Misery Is An Inescapable Cycle

Writer-director Sudabeh Mortezai’s exploration of Nigerian sex workers in Vienna is an inevitably tough watch, bereft almost entirely of what the title suggests. Although her handling of such sensitive issues is too cautious, Mortezai’s work impressively closes the gap between…

“Shadow” Should Have Stayed In The Dark

Epic only in its headache-inducing abilities, Zhang Yimou’s ambitious 3rd Century centred Shadow says little of the historical source material upon which it is based. But a morsel of enjoyment comes from laughing at the sheer absurdity of what the creators thought…